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QPR Training

The Programme:

QPR stands for Question, Persuade, and Refer — the 3 simple steps anyone can learn to help save a life from suicide. Just as people trained in CPR and the Heimlich Maneuver help save thousands of lives each year, people trained in QPR learn how to recognize the warning signs of a suicide crisis and how to question, persuade, and refer someone to help. Each year thousands of people, like you, are saying "Yes" to saving the life of a friend, colleague, sibling, or neighbour.  QPR can be learned in our Gatekeeper course in as little as one hour.

How is QPR like CPR?:

Both are interventions. Much of the world is familiar with CPR — short for cardiopulmonary resuscitation — an emergency medical intervention created in 1957 by Peter Safar. The process is designed to stabilize people who aren’t breathing or breathing intermittently and who may be in cardiac arrest until the person can reach a hospital or other care.

Similarly, QPR is an an emergency mental health intervention for suicidal persons created in 1995 by Paul Quinnett. An abbreviation for Question, Persuade and Refer, the intent is also to identify and interrupt the crisis and direct that person to the proper care.

Both are part of a "Chain of Survival": Both CPR and QPR are part of systems designed to increase the chance of survival in the event of a crisis.

As a QPR-trained Gatekeeper you will learn to:
  • Recognise the warning signs of suicide

  • Know how to offer hope

  • Know how to get help and save a life

Early Recognition:

We cannot overemphasise the need for early recognition of suicide warning signs.

A well-executed, strong and positive response to the early warning signs of a pending suicide event may render subsequent links in the Chain of Survival unnecessary.

 

Most people thinking about suicide are suffering from an undiagnosed and/or untreated mental illness or substance abuse disorder for which excellent treatments exist.

 

The prompt recognition of the scream of a smoke detector can eliminate the need to suppress a raging fire. In just that way, by recognising early the warning signs of suicide, opening a supporting dialogue with a suicidal person and securing consultation a professional may prevent the need for an emergency room visit or psychiatric hospitalisation.

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